A Typical Atypical Rack


I’ve never shot a deer with a truly atypical rack. I once shot a little buck with only one antler but I figured he was born with a standard rack and had half of it knocked off in a fight. I’ve shot a few bucks with more points on one side than the other but I don’t think that’s considered atypical as far as official Boone & Crockett scoring goes.

 

But THIS guy has a decidedly ATYPICAL rack, what we would call deformed, like a guy with six fingers on one hand. I owe these wonderful photos to my friend Dave Zumbaugh’s trail cam. Dave lives just outside Shawnee Mission Park in eastern, Kansas where white tails practically outnumber the leaves on the trees. So Dave’s trail cam get’s a LOT of cool shots like these.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another big Kansas Whitetail buck

When this big Kansas whitetail buck was born The Lord told him, “Son, I’ve got good news and bad news. The good news is that I’m giving you a BRAIN. It’s a wonderful thing. You can use it to find food and to keep from getting shot by some redneck with a rifle or bow. And I’m giving you a PENIS, which is also a wonderful thing. It will bring you great pleasure and you can use it to propagate your species.” The little buck said, “Golly! That sounds great! But what’s the bad news?” to which The Lord answered, “I’m only giving you enough blood supply to use one of them at a time.”

You can see where this big guy hides out in the daytime. He usually comes out to play only in the daylight. But look what he’s doing. Which of God’s gifts do you think he’s using now?

A big thank you to my buddy Scott and his army of trail cams for sharing this photo with me.

 

 

 

 

Vintage Outdoor sports cartoons

If it seems like I’ve been doing this  a long time it’s because I’ve been doing this  a long time. My first cartoon about outdoor sports was published in Sports Afield…or maybe it was Field & Stream, in 1964.It was followed by a long stream of others too humorus to mention.

 

 

 

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Camo Wars

Every year hunting apparel manufacturers bring out at least one new camouflage pattern. Pity the poor soul who shows up at hunting camp sporting last year’s pattern. And if       you’re seen wearing the original old government issue brown-over-more-brown pattern…well…turn in your man card and go play jumprope with the girls.

This story was published in the November 2003 issue of Bowhunting magazine.

 

Rich Man, Poor Man

In 2012 I was writing columns for two publications: Wildfowl magazine and Wyoming Wildlife News. It kept me so busy I hardly had time to hunt and fish.

The Wildfowl page was called Fowl Thoughts. Here’s the column from the September 2012 issue. Click on the text to enlarge it.

 

 

 

 

Fishing is NOT cancelled

This is a tough time for our country, actually for the  international community.   But this morning it was kind of hard for me to concentrate on how serious the  situation is when Capt. Andrew Mizell of Southern Marsh Charters  and I  were taking off for a few hours of fly fishing for redfish. Isn’t that what fishing is all about?

Northward Bound

The main reason several guys go together and spend a lot of time and money to buy, develop and manage a piece of duck hunting property is so they’ll have their own duck hunting place. It’s a yearlong job but a labor of love.

Many things can thwart a promising duck season: weather patterns, migration irregularities, competition from nearby waterfowl habitat. But whether or not the Duck Gods favor you in the fall, the habitat you develop will be valuable to the birds on their long, dangerous journey north in the spring.

This video was shot in Bates County, MO after an early spring thaw. Most of these birds are probably mallards with a sprinkling of pintail, gadwall, widgeon and teal. They are enjoying this little 185 acre parcel of wetland habitat as a resting and feeding stop-over on the way north to their breeding grounds in the prairie pothole regions of the northern United States and Canada.

This little 185 acre parcel of marsh and woodland not only benefits ducks. Canada geese nest here every year. Snipe, herons and other shore birds frequent it year-round. White tail deer, raccoons, possums,  turkeys,  bobcats and countless songbirds make frequent  use of it.

Want to help conserve wetland habitat? Even if you don’t hunt, buy a federal duck stamp.They’re available for $25 every fall from your local post office. And support Ducks Unlimited http://www.ducks.org .